NEWS - May 22, 2015

Class Action Lawsuit filed over Deer Lake flooding

(from http://www.thewesternstar.com/ May 22, 2015)

The death of Don Dunphy is a tragedy that has affected not only his immediate family and community but the province as a whole. It’s a sign of how close-knit and down-to-earth we are that when one of our own is killed, there is a collective outpouring of grief and outrage. And when that death occurs under troubling and mystifying circumstances, it causes a natural sense of fear and demand for answers and action.

The officer at the centre of the controversy over why and how Mr. Dunphy was killed has not been named, and the investigation is ongoing. Yet on Friday that officer sent a mass email to his colleagues, which has since been released to the media and published and shared widely.

- See more at: http://theindependent.ca/2015/04/13/officers-letter-in-don-dunphy-killing-inflames-controversy/#sthash.aLNuROaa.dpuf

The lawsuit was filed by Bob Buckingham Law of St. John's and Wagners Law Firm of Halifax. The two law firms, both with experience in class actions, and Wagners with experience in environmental class actions, represent plaintiffs Richard Dewey, William Perry, Charlotte Jacobs and William Turner. All the plaintiffs live in Deer Lake.

 

Full article available here.
My firm has been contacted by a number of individuals affected by the Deer Lake Canal seepage and we have filed a Class Action lawsuit.  I am working with Mr. Ray Wagner of Wagners Law in Halifax, Nova Scotia on this matter.  If you are a Deer Lake resident affected by the canal seepage please fill out our Contact Form under our Contact Us Tab above.  **It is important to clearly indicate in the Form that your inquiring about the Deer Lake Canal Class Action** Thank you.
Click here to view the Statement of Claim
Click here to view the Press Release

 

At a general level this is not a bad thing: public debate and discussion is to be encouraged, especially at moments like this. And finally we have an astonishingly frank perspective from a police officer, as opposed to the increasingly incomprehensible bureaucratese in which police spokespersons tend to speak these days (a ponderous, over-cautious language in which a person is no longer stabbed, but ‘admitted to hospital with injuries consistent with those of a stabbing,’ and so forth). - See more at: http://theindependent.ca/2015/04/13/officers-letter-in-don-dunphy-killing-inflames-controversy/#sthash.aLNuROaa.dpuf


At a general level this is not a bad thing: public debate and discussion is to be encouraged, especially at moments like this. And finally we have an astonishingly frank perspective from a police officer, as opposed to the increasingly incomprehensible bureaucratese in which police spokespersons tend to speak these days (a ponderous, over-cautious language in which a person is no longer stabbed, but ‘admitted to hospital with injuries consistent with those of a stabbing,’ and so forth). - See more at: http://theindependent.ca/2015/04/13/officers-letter-in-don-dunphy-killing-inflames-controversy/#sthash.aLNuROaa.dpuf

NEWS - May 2015

'Kiewit laptop theft puts workers' personal information at risk'

(from www.cbc.ca, May 12, 2015)

The death of Don Dunphy is a tragedy that has affected not only his immediate family and community but the province as a whole. It’s a sign of how close-knit and down-to-earth we are that when one of our own is killed, there is a collective outpouring of grief and outrage. And when that death occurs under troubling and mystifying circumstances, it causes a natural sense of fear and demand for answers and action.

The officer at the centre of the controversy over why and how Mr. Dunphy was killed has not been named, and the investigation is ongoing. Yet on Friday that officer sent a mass email to his colleagues, which has since been released to the media and published and shared widely.

- See more at: http://theindependent.ca/2015/04/13/officers-letter-in-don-dunphy-killing-inflames-controversy/#sthash.aLNuROaa.dpuf
According to the statement, the laptop was stolen from a parked rental car in Montreal.
On it was personal information that would be found on a T4 slip, including names, social insurance numbers and addresses.The company said the laptop was password-protected at the time, but that they are still taking measures to remove information from the computer should it be connected to the internet.
Full article at cbc.ca
My firm has been contacted by a number of individuals affected by this privacy breach resulting from the lost laptop and we anticipate filing a Class Action in the next few days. Anyone affected by this privacy breach can fill out our Contact Form under our Contact Us Tab above. Thank you.

The death of Don Dunphy is a tragedy that has affected not only his immediate family and community but the province as a whole. It’s a sign of how close-knit and down-to-earth we are that when one of our own is killed, there is a collective outpouring of grief and outrage. And when that death occurs under troubling and mystifying circumstances, it causes a natural sense of fear and demand for answers and action.

The officer at the centre of the controversy over why and how Mr. Dunphy was killed has not been named, and the investigation is ongoing. Yet on Friday that officer sent a mass email to his colleagues, which has since been released to the media and published and shared widely.

- See more at: http://theindependent.ca/2015/04/13/officers-letter-in-don-dunphy-killing-inflames-controversy/#sthash.aLNuROaa.dpu

Justice In Review

- October 2014

  Courtesy of Kevin Tobin and The Telegram

Bob Buckingham - Kevin Tobin The Telegram



 

'Renaming Justice Dept. Concerning

Despite Flip-Flop: Buckingham'

(from VOCM.com, October 14, 2014)

A prominent lawyer who was critical of the Premier's decision to rename the province's Justice Department says Paul Davis' flip-flop doesn't change how he feels.

Davis announced late Friday that a week after changing the name of thedepartment to 'Public Safety' he would be changing it again to 'Justice and Public Safety'. Davis says the move was prompted by feedback he'd heard from people about the confusion created with the name change.

But lawyer Bob Buckingham says the whole thing just goes to show how out of touch government is with the people. Buckingham maintains justice and public safety are two very different things.

For the full article and audio interview, visit click here. For more information about the recent changes to Newfoundland and Labrador's Department of Justice, please visit Media Links.



IMPORTANT NOTE

This site is not designed to answer questions about your individual situation or entitlement. Do not rely upon the information provided on this website as legal advice in respect of your individual situation nor use it as a substitute for individual legal advice.

This website is updated from time to time to provide potential class members or clients with news about ongoing cases.


The lawyer's code of professional conduct requires lawyers to fearlessly represent their clients.
Bob Buckingham embraces that
obligation

Contact Bob Buckingham Law, where we make the justice system work for you!